Rindoon – Ireland’s Camelot

The abandoned medieval town of Rindoon is located on the peninsula of St. John’s Point on the western shore of Lough Ree in Co. Roscommon. The remains of the town, including a castle, church, hospital, town walls and mill, are unique in Ireland. The town was built in the first half of the 13th century by Anglo-Normans.  However, the name of the place Rindoon (Rinn Dúin), “the fort of the promontory” would indicate a pre-Norman occupation.

Rindoon was first occupied by the Anglo-Normans around 1227 when Toirdelbach
Ó Conchobhair and Geoffrey Marisco erected a castle on the peninsula. Its convenient location on the river Shannon provided Rindoon with opportunity of being a trading centre between the Norman controlled towns and the native Irish. It is believed that hides and dairy products were exported from Rindoon, whereas cloth, corn and wine were  imported through the town.

In the late 13th and early 14th centuries the town was often attacked by the native Irish.  In 1343 the town finally fell.
Contrary to similar Anglo-Norman settlements Rindoon has remained abandoned and largely untouched since the 14th century (except for a period of a few years during the Elizabethan period when the castle was garrisoned) and that makes the place especially interesting and special.

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